The local union, which represents nearly 2,300 employees evaluated every hour, writes complaints about the behavior of external contractors last week near gate No. 4 of the steelmaker on Avenue Goulais. Algoma argued that the self-isolation policy was appropriate in all circumstances, given the size of the company (nearly 3,000 employees), the infection rates in northern Michigan (three times higher than those in the Algoma District), the fact that it does not violate the collective agreement and the company`s obligations under Section 25(2)(h) of the OHSA to take all appropriate measures to protect a worker. Algoma acknowledged its obligations of the OHRC to host on the basis of civil status, but argued that, in the current circumstances, the Grievor did not have accommodation without unreasonable harshness. The union filed a complaint about the Tapping In program, claiming that algoma`s unilateral implementation violated the company`s obligation to recognize the union as the sole negotiator for workers and a violation of its profit-seeking obligation under the collective agreement. However, the arbitrator also noted that the collective agreement does not explicitly prohibit the introduction of a recognition and reward program and that Algoma has the right to direct employees as it pleases, except as expressly provided in the agreement. These included `unlimited discretion to make decisions, including bad decisions`, which could have an impact on overall turnover, irrespected of the profit-making agreement. The union also argued that the costs of the program were deducted from the pool available for distribution to its members through the incentive plan, since the collective agreement preceded a formula on Sault Ste. Marie`s annual revenues. Marie companies are based in Algoma. The union said the cost of the program should be excluded from the calculation of net income. The arbitrator noted that the general article of the collective agreement states that Algoma and the union are committed to “a reciprocally respectful, consultative and participatory relationship,” but the unilateral introduction of the Tapping In program “could, from a union perspective, appear as an insult to the violation.” An Ontario company`s recognition and reward program violated its union`s bargaining rights and collective agreement, an arbitrator ruled.

Algoma Steel is a steel company in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. On January 23, 2018, Algoma implemented a points-based reward and recognition program for employees called “Tapping In”,” to promote a culture of thanks for employees and teams who have delivered good performance and supported the company`s values. The program used a third-party computer platform with different forms of recognition and reward. The union argued that its collective bargaining underscored the equality of all workers in Algoma. The collective agreement would standardize hourly wage scales and classifications, as well as cost-of-living adjustments and other non-wage aspects of compensation, such as. B credits for workers who did not need safety boots corresponding to the allocation of safety footwear. The introduction of the Tapping In program and the assignment of Steelies at the discretion of superiors “undermined the principle of equality in the collective agreement and resulted in some members receiving higher pay than others for the same work,” the union said. SAULT STE. MARIE – United Steelworkers Local 2251, Algoma Steel`s largest collective bargaining unit, is preparing formal complaints about COVID-19 physical distancing issues.

Police are helpful, he said, but aren`t sure if they`re responsible for the steel plant`s private land. The arbitrator ultimately found that Algoma had breached its duty to consult or negotiate the introduction of the program with the union as well as the compensation provisions of the collective agreement. . . .